Lacing technique

by - 5:47 PM

Straight (European) Lacing
Sometimes referred to as "Ladder Lacing"
This traditional method of Straight Lacing appears to be more common in Europe. The laces run straight across on the outside and diagonally on the inside.
Straight (European) Lacing diagram
Straight (European) Lacing picture 1
Straight (European) Lacing picture 2
My Dad's dress shoes demonstrate how Straight (European) Lacing allows the shoe sides to come completely together.
Lacing Technique:
1. The lace is run straight across the bottom (grey section) and the ends are fed in through both bottom eyelets.

2. The right (yellow) end is crossed diagonally on the inside and emerges through the next eyelet up the shoe, then continues straight across on the outside and is fed in through the eyelet on the opposite side.

3. The left (blue) end is crossed diagonally on the inside at a steeper angle, skipping past one eyelet to emerge through the next empty eyelet up the shoe. It then continues straight across on the outside and is fed in through the eyelet on the opposite side.

4. Repeat step (3) with each end in turn, each time running diagonally on the inside and straight across on the outside, until both ends reach the top eyelets.


Features:
Neat on top
Messy underneath

Comparative Length = 105%
Laced area uses more (about +5%)
Longer laces needed (about +2%)
Shortens lace ends (about −4%)
More details


NOTE:
Although visually messy, the underlying zig-zag makes this lacing very tight & secure. The mess is mainly noticeable on shoes and sneakers with a wide spacing (as seen in the first photo at left). On dress shoes, where the sides of the shoes are designed to meet in the middle, the underlying zig-zag will be completely hidden (as seen in the second photo at left).

In addition, this lacing allows the shoe sides to come completely together without interruption, resulting in less bunching and corrugation of the shoe uppers.

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